CHRO Summit US | November 1, 2017 | New York, NY, USA

↓ Agenda Key

Keynote Presentation

Visionary speaker presents to entire audience on key issues, challenges and business opportunities

Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee." title="Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee.

Executive Visions

Panel moderated by Master of Ceremonies and headed by four executives discussing critical business topics

Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members." title="Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members.

Thought Leadership

Solution provider-led session giving high-level overview of opportunities

Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community." title="Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community.

Think Tank

End user-led session in boardroom style, focusing on best practices

Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard." title="Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard.

Roundtable

Interactive session led by a moderator, focused on industry issue

Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done." title="Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done.

Case Study

Overview of recent project successes and failures

Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions." title="Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions.

Focus Group

Discussion of business drivers within a particular industry area

Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions." title="Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions.

Analyst Q&A Session

Moderator-led coverage of the latest industry research

Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst." title="Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst.

Vendor Showcase

Several brief, pointed overviews of the newest solutions and services

Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences." title="Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences.

Executive Exchange

Pre-determined, one-on-one interaction revolving around solutions of interest

Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest." title="Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest.

Open Forum Luncheon

Informal discussions on pre-determined topics

Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch." title="Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch.

Networking Session

Unique activities at once relaxing, enjoyable and productive

Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive." title="Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive.

 

Tuesday, November 1, 2016 - CHRO Summit US

7:00 am - 7:55 am

Registration and Networking Breakfast

 

8:00 am - 8:10 am

Welcome Address and Opening Remarks

 

8:10 am - 8:40 am

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Keynote Presentation

Developing as an Effective CHRO

As the complexity of the modern business increases as a result of factors such as economical, and societal change CHROs are being met with increased expectations and are having to rapidly broaden their areas of responsibility and capability. Identifying the necessary competencies for success as a CHRO however, and selecting the development opportunities that are most applicable to developing them, can be a challenging undertaking. CHROs must develop the skills to perform as a trusted advisor to the CEO and an organizational leader that drives value for the organization rather than merely focusing on the functional role of the HR department.

Takeaways:

  • In order to meet organizational expectations around leadership CHROs must first establish credibility by showing their ability to successfully lead their own HR function
  • The most common expectation of the CHRO is the ability to drive alignment with organizational strategies and deliver bottom-line results
  • Development efforts should focus on strategic thinking, dynamic learning, and collaborative capability as the core
 

8:45 am - 9:15 am

Keynote Presentation

TBD
 

9:20 am - 9:45 am

Executive Exchange

 

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Thought Leadership

Optimizing Internal Communications

We operate today in a knowledge-driven economy, one that demands greater sharing of information than ever before and, as a result, internal communication are of greater importance than ever before. However, because internal communications are the responsibility of so many different entities there is often a lack of co-ordination in messaging and messages resulting in at best confused and at worst conflicting communications. To address these issues, enterprises must develop and enterprise-wide communications strategy that takes into account current and future communications needs as seen through the lens of corporate and individual objectives.

Takeaways:

  • Improved communications won’ happen organically, though left alone they will organically become worse
  • While HR can lead the development of a communications strategy, organizational stakeholders must be the active participants that drive development
  • Your communications plan will need a mix of communications methodologies depending on the nature of the message, its audience, and the body delivering it
 

9:50 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Implementing Flex Work

Traditional, rigid workplace schedules no longer make the needs or desires of employees and as organizations struggle to attract and retain talent due to skill shortages, the implementation of flexible working arrangements are increasingly becoming an essential employment benefit. Flexible work directly combats the issues of employee fatigue, stress, disengagement, and even absenteeism but adoption requires a change in old-school nine-to-five-at-the-desk thinking. Flexible work is a top-three request benefit of not just Millennials, but also Generation X and Baby Boom employees so finding a way to offer this capability can be the difference between a robust and happy workforce, or a constant struggle to attract and retain the necessary resources for organizational success.

Takeaways:

  • Flexible work arrangements are about more than just flex work time, also including flex time-off and flex work location; don’t constrain your flex work artificially
  • Employees are likely already implementing their own flex work arrangements by taking work home etc. – formalization will increase productivity and limit risks
  • Executive buy-in is essential for flex work success; breaking down old-school thinking can be the biggest hurdles to overcome.

Executive Boardroom

Developing an Effective Talent Retention Strategy

As the business environment becomes increasingly complex and competitive, attracting and retaining talent becomes critically important and so ad hoc retention strategies are no longer sufficient, especially for organizations already facing skills shortages. Too often retention is labelled as an HR problem however the truth is far different and resolution demands equal and active participation from HR and business unit leadership. Any retention program must be based on data and that data should be derived from a variety of sources among them engagement surveys and exit interviews so that the entire employee lifecycle is measured and reflected.

Takeaways:

  • Avoid focusing on limited data sets; each piece of information will come with its own biases and limitations that only aggregated data can identify and exclude
  • Make sure to leverage current employees; waiting until their gone is too late to figure out what could have kept them and could keep others
  • Any retention strategy must include tactics that address key issues; identifying consistent turnover themes is key to addressing the most pressing issues first
 

10:20 am - 10:30 am

Networking Break

 

10:35 am - 11:00 am

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

HR Integration During M&A Activities

Mergers and acquisitions are a fact of life in today’s ultra-competitive business landscape where if you’re not growing, you’re failing. Unfortunately, M&A failure rate is pegged between 50 and 70% with one of the biggest destroyers of value being culture clashes between the employees of the two organizations coming together. HR needs to take an active hand in all M&A activities, not just to manage the inevitable cultural conflicts, but to build a consistent and justifiable process for figuring out who should stay and who should go as workforces come together and redundancies are identified.

Takeaways:

  • M&A success is determined over the long term so HR’s involvement should occur over the same time frame – from due diligence through the end of the first post merger year
  • Key focus areas include communications consistency and cultural integration as well as short and long term workforce planning
  • The first hurdle that needs to be overcome for HR in any M&A activity is the integration of the divergent HR departments

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Think Tank

Developing a Strategic Workforce Plan

Human capital is increasingly becoming a prime mover of enterprise valuation and a differentiator among organizations and their competitors however managers aren’t sure what kinds of people with what kinds of skills they need to get the competitive edge they require. Strategic Workforce Planning isn’t something that HR can do alone; it’s an extension of the business planning process and therefore something in which business leadership needs to be actively involved. Building a plan that first captures the gaps that exist in the skills and headcount that is needed to achieve business objectives and then provides direction in prioritization of addressing those deficiencies is key.

Takeaways:

  • As the pace of technology change increases and skill requirements diverge even further, strategic workforce planning will only become more important over time
  • Nearly half of all business leaders consider strategic workforce plans to be an important initiative, yet less than one in seven believe there is effective
  • Planning does not have to be onerous but does need involvement of the right people and investment of the right amount of time; this is not an overnight initiative

Call for Speakers

 

11:05 am - 11:30 am

Executive Exchange

 

Case Study

Achieving Alignment Between the Business and HR

HR has to do more with less and has trouble articulating its value proposition to the business because it is misaligned with overall business strategy, does not know how to track and report on its progress and effectiveness, or both. A strategic plan is becoming increasingly necessary but requires an initial time investment that can be difficult to justify when HR is existing in a firefighting mode. Developing an HR strategic plan that is aligned with business objectives however allows the department to rapidly increase its efficiency so that HR professionals can become more focused on solutions to business problems by providing a framework to structure work efforts.

Takeaways:

  • Business leaders, and CEOs especially, are often frustrated with how HR is performing seeing them as an impediment to success rather than as a facilitator
  • HR strategic plans need to be both agile enough to address changing business demands yet robust enough to provide consistent structure and support
  • Efficiency is the key in any HR strategic plan " the ability to resolve a greater number of issues in a lesser amount of time is essential to HR and therefore business success
 

11:35 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Scalable Succession Planning

Within organizations it is generally select staffers holding key roles that represent the most valued skills and knowledge and, should these key employees depart for any reason there is real organization risk as a result of the loss of vital knowledge and core business relationships. Further complicating matters the Baby Boomer generation is collectively coming ever closer to mass retirement yet nearly 60% of organizations have not invested the time of effort to plan for their loss. Since planning and executing on key role transition can take years, organizations should begin to prepare now to mitigate the risk of loss later.

Takeaways:

  • Baby boomers represent nearly 40% of the current workforce but that figure is expected to decline to just 15% within less than a dozen years
  • Most organizations have no succession planning or workforce planning initiatives in place and so are extremely susceptible to the loss of key individuals
  • Loss of knowledge is one of the biggest negative influencers on organizational value and competitiveness

Executive Boardroom

Making the Case for Employee Engagement

Employee engagement is the degree to which employees are emotionally connected and committed to their organization and their role and which results in three notable benefits; enhanced employee performance, retention, and creativity. Beyond the positive benefits of engagement however, businesses must also assess the negative impacts of disengagement and the fact that disengaged employees can have a multiplying effect on peer performance and productivity, bringing the rest of the team down with them. To be able to downplay the negative and focus on the positive, HR leaders need to make employee engagement a focus and must begin this journey through the use of comprehensive employee engagement surveys used to measure engagement levels and identify engagement problems.

Takeaways:

  • Engaged employees are 150% more likely to go above and beyond, 500% more likely to be committed to their organization, and 100% more likely to be innovative at work
  • Employee engagement figures directly affect the bottom line – organizations with highly engaged workforces report earnings growth that it three times that of their peers
  • On average only 1 in 3 employees is actively engaged while 1 in 4 is actively disengaged but until you know why, you can’t change that ratio
 

12:05 pm - 12:30 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Managing Global Teams

Global expansion is becoming an increasing reality for businesses of all sizes as they recognize the importance of new markets for business growth and sustainability but global expansion means a global workforce that poses challenges local managers aren’t equipped to handle. While the competencies required to manage global teams are functionally no different than those of local teams, complications arise due to cultural differences as well as time zone variation that can inhibit direct communication. Global teams only work where trust is strong between team members and this extends to decision making rights that allow remote workers the flexibility to take action that might normally be supervised more tightly in a local management situation.

Takeaways:

  • Building trust has the greatest impact on the success of global teams and should be the area of primary focus for global team leads
  • Additional areas that will need focus and development include setting direction, communicating and managing performance expectations, and creating empowerment
  • Overcoming cultural differences will be the biggest challenge, one that can only happen if both parties are willing to adjust

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Think Tank

Refining the HR Organization Structure

HR department organizational structure often just fall into place over time with little effort being invested on strategy and direction as a result of HR leaders being too focused on external problems to focus their attention on the long-term needs of their own departments. Before undertaking a structural revamp, evaluate in-place programs and people to make sure they are not the source of problems; an organizational revamp is an involved process that should only be undertaken if needed. HR structure must be designed based on business strategy and values in order to provide efficient and effective support capabilities so a business-base alignment is key to success.

Takeaways:

  • Poor HR structure leads to excess costs, decreased efficiency, and poor employee effectiveness within the HR department
  • To have any credibility as a champion of positive employee interaction, HR must have its own house in order
  • The biggest hurdle to overcome will be employee resistance to change, from within HR, from the general employee pool, and from management so communications are key

Call for Speakers

 

12:35 pm - 1:20 pm

Networking Luncheon

 

1:25 pm - 1:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Develop and Engage Employees with High Potential

There is significant ROI realized through investment in high potential practices, and the most popular development initiatives are not costly. Organizations that identify high potential employees are almost twice as successful at succession planning as organizations that do not. Successfully evaluating high potential employees requires a rigorous process that involves setting appropriate criteria and having managers collaboratively discuss employees. For high potential identification to make a difference, organizations must commit to employee development and govern the program throughout the year, not just at performance appraisal time.

Takeaways:

  • The cost of training is on the rise while employee tenure is on the decline; as a result, organizations need to make informed decisions about which employees to develop
  • Managers tend to downplay the impact of human capital issues as they are focused on the business problems of today making them blind to the problems of tomorrow
  • High potential employees come in all shapes and sizes and have different areas of potential so your evaluation process needs to be open to this variance

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Think Tank

Building and Implementing an Internship Program

Internships are on the rise as both employers, who are facing a shortage of skilled labor with key skills, and prospective employees, who face a challenging and competitive marketplace, are each making them a focus. Internships can add notable value but they fail when organizations are not clear about the goals of the internship program or the learning objectives of the interns. Since the business value of an internship is directly related to the positive experience the intern has so designing a program that focus on company and individual objectives is key. 

Takeaways:

  • Filling internships is no different that hiring employees; you need a clear plan, a defined process, and an effective management structure
  • The internship transaction needs to create positive value for both the employer and the interns
  • You cannot expect interns to learn organically, they need appropriate supervision and mentorship to meet the goals they and the company have for the internship

Call for Speakers

 

1:55 pm - 2:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Transitioning to Leadership-Driven Employee Engagement

It is well known that engaged employees are more productive that their disengaged peers so investing in employee engagement only makes sense but traditional measures of engagement only capture a portion of the story. Leaving engagement purely in the hands of HR is a recipe for a lack of success since true engagement occurs at the individual level and is most affected by a linkage of employee efforts with business goals making this a management affected issue. Increasing manager accountability and linking engagement with business ideals such as agility, quality, cost, and revenue will have a greater direct effect on engagement results, offer greater insight into engagement levels and result in more engaged employees.

Takeaways:

  • HR is often held accountable for engagement scores but has little direct ability to influence them; it’s time to shift the focus to where it belongs
  • Engaged employees can be as much as three times more productive than their disengaged peers so engagement is not something to be taken lightly
  • Leaders have the greatest impact of employee engagement and so must integrate effective leadership practices into daily activities to positively impact engagement
 

2:25 pm - 2:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Building a Career Path Planning Process

An enterprise-wide career path framework with consistently defined career tiers, competencies, and proficiency levels ensures that both employees and managers can clearly identify transferrable skills and potential career path opportunities. A structured career path framework also helps integrate a variety of HR programs that are often disjointed which saves time and effort and enables a consistent employee experience. A career lattice approach can be used by managers and employees to plan outside the traditional vertical movement to also include lateral and even downward movements to reach long-term development goals.

Takeaways:

  • Lack of career path planning is generally regarded as the number one cause of employee departure
  • Lack of career path planning is not only problematic for employees but for employers too as it makes it difficult to transition employees between departments and functions
  • A career path framework should identify generic and core competencies, proficiency levels for each competency, and job family competencies and proficiency levels by tier

Executive Boardroom

Using Gamification to Enhance Employee Engagement

Employee engagement levels are critically low within many organizations and so employers are being challenged to find new and innovative ways to address the problem and gamification is seen as potentially having a very positive impact. To be successful though gamification really must be done right and HR leaders must take the time to identify the right variables or gamification can actually decrease engagement levels. Constant review of gamification initiatives will be required throughout the lifecycle to ensure it stays fresh, engaging, and effective otherwise it becomes just another mediocre tactic once the novelty wears off.

Takeaways:

  • Gamification is not for everyone or every organization " you have to know your company culture and know whether gamification will be an engagement boon or bane
  • Gamification is about much about the resources that run it, the game masters if you will, as it is about the games that are played so make sure you are leveraging your people right
  • Building gamification is only the first step " implementation must also be planned carefully as gamification won't be adopted organically by all
 

2:55 pm - 3:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Build a Management and Leadership Development Program

Looming talent shortages due to the expected Baby Boomer workplace exodus have motivated many organizations to place leadership development amongst their top priorities. Leadership development goes hand-in-hand with succession planning as it prepares pipeline candidates to move into critical roles while also playing a significant factor in improving engagement and reducing turnover rates. To prepare for the future you must develop a leadership program that aligns leadership competencies with organizational needs and prioritizing the largest competency gaps.

Takeaways:

  • The greatest amount of learning occurs in on-the-job experiences but correlating experiential learning with formal training makes development more successful
  • Gain buy-in for the program with a clear business case that highlights results-based success as an outcome of the program
  • Leadership development must be a company-wide initiative; current managers must be on-board as they will provide much of the development oversight

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Think Tank

Improving Enterprise Talent Acquisition

Poor talent acquisition outcomes are an acute issue for many organizations and hiring the wrong candidates is an expensive mistake, costing an organization up to 2 times an employee’s annual salary, in addition to indirect costs such as lowered employee morale and customer satisfaction. Few organizations invest in a structured talent acquisition process that evaluates all relevant factors (branding, sourcing, assessment, internal mobility. To improve talent acquisition you need to gain perspective and insights through a comprehensive audit by gathering feedback from the key stakeholder groups which will allow for comparison of performance across multiple touch points, identification of breaking points, identification of where time and money are being wasted, and gathering of recommendations for improvement.

Takeaways:

  • Talent acquisition processes need to be tied to each individual employee segment since each has different needs and wants and a one-size-fits-all approach won’t reflect them
  • Talent acquisition is often a thorny issue of most companies but few can pinpoint the problems with their process without a proper audit
  • You can’t address all aspects of a broken talent acquisition process at once and so will need to prioritize your efforts based on the problems that exist and the goals you have

Call for Speakers

 

3:25 pm - 3:35 pm

Networking Break

 

3:40 pm - 4:05 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Innovation Showcase

An exclusive opportunity to be exposed to the hottest new solutions providers in a quick-hit format designed to whet the appetite and spark immediate interest.
 

4:10 pm - 4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Think Tank

Assessing Employee Talent to Extract Maximum Employee Value

Internal talent assessment is vital to the success of many talent programs such as succession planning and leadership planning but to be effective needs to measure performance and potential in a straightforward, understandable, and repeatable way. Talent assessments must be structured to allow for clear identification of top employees as well as the underachievers that can bring a department down. Using a simple matrix that evaluates performance against potential is a great way to see who is making a difference, who has the potential to make a difference, and who doesn't.

Takeaways:

  • Talent management programs must be built on a solid talent assessment process as their foundation
  • Talent assessments can have a direct and positive impact on not just employee performance but also employee retention by identifying area for future development
  • Talent assessment can be sponsored by HR but needs to be executed on by line management since individual managers have the greatest degree of interaction with staff

Think Tank

Re-engaging Disengaged Employees

Engagement surveys do a great job of measuring overall engagement levels and identifying trends that affect the employee population as a whole, but do a terrible job of identifying actual individual disengaged employees. Re-engaging disengaged employees can be an expensive and time-consuming affair, but so can replacing them should you determine that re-engagement is not an option; nonetheless it is pointless pursuing lost causes and you have to determine carefully which disengaged employees can actually be reengaged. Engagement is unique to the individual and one-size approaches to re-engagement are as likely to create more disengagement as they are to resolve the problem so the re-engagement approach must be tailored to each individual.

Takeaways:

  • Get to know the common signs and symptoms of disengagement so that you can nip the problem in the bud before it becomes too deeply seated
  • One disengaged employee can have a negative effect on the entire department if allowed to continue uncheckedThe first conversation with a disengaged employee about their disengagement will set the tone for future efforts so it must be approached with caution and care
 

4:40 pm - 5:20 pm

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Executive Visions Panel

Managing C-Suite Conflict

While some measure of conflict amongst C-Suite executives can be a useful motivator and filter for bad ideas, an unhealthy level of conflict can result in a lack of collaboration, can derail even the best organizational strategy, and have a real impact on the bottom line. HR walks a tricky path in trying to resolve C-Suite conflict since the CHRO is a member of the C-Suite themselves and doesn’t want to be seen to be using their role to influence relationships to their own advantage. The key to resolving C-Suite conflict relies on ensuring the CEO is onboard; without his or her support obtaining traction from the rest of the executive team will be impossible to achieve.

Takeaways:

  • The head of HR should address C-Suite conflict not because they are HR but because they are leaders in the organization and leadership sets the tone
  • A culture of prevalent C-Suite conflict will lead to a culture of conflict throughout the organization
  • C-Suite conflict can only be resolved delicately and through collaboration; everyone must accept responsibility for the problem and responsibility for the resolution
 

5:20 pm - 5:30 pm

Thank You Address and Closing Remarks

 

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Cocktail Reception